Economic Change and Restructuring

Jones, John Bailey*, and Sohini Sahu

Jones

ABSTRACT

Using a quantitative methodology designed specifically for emerging economies, we measure the components of India’s economic growth over the period 1960–2005. Our approach accounts for time-varying parameters, transitional dynamics and non-linear trends. We find that increased productivity in the service sector, facilitated by a structural shift toward services, is the principal driver of India’s economic growth. Our measures also suggest that the allocation of inputs across sectors has not improved over this period, and in the case of labor appears to have significantly worsened. We further find that fluctuations in output around its trend are due primarily to fluctuations in sector-specific total factor productivity, with fluctuations in labor market distortions and labor taxes also playing important roles. In the period 1960–1980, productivity fluctuations in the agricultural sector are the dominant source of cycles. Since then, productivity fluctuations in the manufacturing and service sectors have been more important.

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* Denotes CSDA Associates, Affiliates, and Staff